Tag Archives: google analytics

Tracking Bing PPC Conversions in Google Analytics

I recently had a head-scratching experience with a client of mine on why Google AdWords PPC conversion data was being recorded with e-commerce tracking in Analytics, but Bing PPC transactions were not.

I spent a goodly amount of time Googling for the answer and after about an hour of searching, I finally found a post by “Whims” in the Google Support Forums that explained the often overlooked setting in Analytics that needs to be enabled in order for PPC tracking to work from search engines that are not Google.

The information provided by “Whims” can be found here.

Specifically, Whims says:
“In the google analytics interface, find the correct GA profile and click “edit” to the right of the applicable profile. When the page opens for the profile settings, on the top right click the link that says “check status” next to where it says Receiving Data.. and on the next page that says Tracking Code.. just below where it says Instructions for Adding Tracking, click on the Advanced tab and make sure to tick the option “I want to track online ad campaigns from other providers”.

But this is not all that is required.

Within your Bing PPC campaigns, you need to make sure that each of your Ad’s “destination URL”s have utm tracking parameters appended. You do not need to do this with Google AdWords destination URL’s because Google Analytics and Google AdWords are connected at deep levels and those parameters are automatically inferred from your AdWords campaign data. But with Bing PPC, you need to pass the parameters so that you get proper source/medium data for your Bing PPC campaigns specifically.

The parameters you pass are:
1. utm_source (e.g. utm_source=Bing)
2. utm_medium (e.g. utm_medium=PPC)
3. utm_campaign (AUTO)
4. utm_term (AUTO)
5. utm_content (AUTO)

The campaign, term, and content parameters can be automatically provided by Bing and passed to your Analytics.

So a URL for an Ad in Bing would look like this:

http://www.example.com/product-category/best-selling-product.html?utm_source=Bing&utm_medium=PPC&utm_term={keyword}&utm_content={AdID}&utm_campaign={OrderItemID}

A great summary (older now, because Yahoo! & Bing have merged platforms) can be found here:
http://www.practicalecommerce.com/articles/1288-Integrating-Yahoo-Search-and-Microsoft-Bing-with-Google-Analytics

So in summary, you need to actually do 3 things to track Bing PPC conversion in Analytics:

1. Add UTM parameters to your Bing PPC destination URL’s as described above.

2. You must enable the “I want to track online ad campaigns from other providers” on the Advanced Tab of the “Check Status” settings link in Analytics. This is turned off by default.

3. Ensure that you enable E-commerce tracking within Analytics. When you first log into Analytics, click the “Edit” button that exists to the right of the Analytics account summary screen. In the first section “Main Website Profile Information”, you’ll see a line called “E-commerce Website:”. By default, it says “No”. Click the “Edit” link in the gray bar all the way to the right (same bar that the Main Website Profile Information header is in) and set that E-commerce Website option to “Yes” and save the settings.

Adding a Subdomain to Google Analytics for Tracking

Look at that – a real first post! As I was finishing configuring this new internet marketing blog, I realized that I set up a sub-domain: seomarketingblog.greenskydevelopment.com for it and that I want to make sure that the Google Analytics’ asynchronous code that I have on the pages tracks the sub-domain for reporting within Analytics. I then realized that this would make a great first post – and true to my word – it’s a sort of tutorial. I hope you find this helpful.

I have Google Analytics asynchronous code on my pages, and “out of the box” it looks like this:

<script type=”text/javascript”>
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-10861556-1’]);
_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);

(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
</script>

This code tracks traffic for www.greenskydevelopment.com. Now I want to make sure that it tracks seomarketingblog.greenskydevelopment.com as well.

I need to add 3 more “_gaq.push(); statements to make it work:

_gaq.push([‘_setDomainName’, ‘.greenskydevelopment.com’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowLinker’, true]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowHash’, false]);

So the end piece of code looks like this:

<script type=”text/javascript”>
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-10861556-1’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setDomainName’, ‘.greenskydevelopment.com’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowLinker’, true]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowHash’, false]);
_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);

(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
</script>

Dealing with tracking a sub-domain of your domain name with Google Analytics is fairly simple. Tracking cross domains (domain names not related to the base web site) or sub-directories on different domain names can get trickier. Luckily, Google has an excellent “how to” document for this.